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Will Home Prices Fall in 2022?

Will Home Prices Fall This Year? Here’s What Experts Say | MyKCM
Hi there!  

Many people are wondering: will home prices fall this year? Whether you’re a potential homebuyer, seller, or both, the answer to this question matters for you. Let’s break down what’s happening with home prices, where experts say they’re headed, and how this impacts your homeownership goals.

What’s Happening with Home Prices? 

Home prices have seen 121 consecutive months (ten years!) of year-over-year increases. CoreLogic says:

Price appreciation averaged 15% for the full year of 2021, up from the 2020 full year average of 6%.”  And in the Gallatin Valley, prices surged nearly 32% over 2021.  To put those numbers into perspective, our local pre-pandemic prices grew at a rate of about 12% year over year.   

So why are prices climbing so much? It’s because there are more buyers than there are homes for sale. This imbalance is expected to maintain that upward pressure on home prices because homes for sale are a hot commodity in today’s low-inventory housing market.

Where Do Experts Say Prices Will Go from Here?

Experts say the housing market isn’t set up for a price decline due to the ongoing imbalance between supply and demand. In the latest home price forecasts for 2022, they’re calling for ongoing appreciation throughout the rest of 2022 (see graph below):

Will Home Prices Fall This Year? Here’s What Experts Say | MyKCM

While the experts are forecasting more moderate price appreciation, the 2022 projections show price gains will remain strong throughout this year. First American explains it like this:

“While house price growth is expected to moderate from the rapid pace of 2021, strong home buyer demand against a backdrop of historically tight inventory of homes for sale will likely keep appreciation positive in the coming year.”

What Does That Mean for You?

The biggest takeaway is that the experts aren't projecting home-price depreciation. If you’re a homeowner thinking about selling, the higher price appreciation over the last two years has been great for your home’s value, but it’s also something you should factor in when planning your next steps. If you’ll also be buying a home after selling your current house, you shouldn’t wait for prices to fall. Waiting will

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Average Homeowner Gained $56K in Equity Over the Past Year (Say Whaat?!)

The Average Homeowner Gained $56,700 in Equity Over the Past Year (Say WHAAT?!)

The Average Homeowner Gained over $56,700 in Equity over the Past Year | MyKCM

Hi there!   

When you think of homeownership, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Chances are you might focus on the non-financial benefits, like the security or stability a home provides. But what about equity? While it can be overlooked, a homeowner’s equity helps build long-term wealth over time. Here’s a look at what equity is and why it matters.

For a homeowner, your equity is the current value of your home minus what you owe on the loan. So, as home values climb, your equity does too. That’s exactly what’s happening today. There aren't enough homes on the market to meet buyer demand, so bidding wars and multiple offers are driving prices up. That’s because people are willing to pay more to buy a home. Right now, this low supply and high demand are giving current homeowners a significant equity boost.

Dr. Frank Nothaft, Chief Economist at CoreLogic, explains it like this:

Home price growth is the principal driver of home equity creation. The CoreLogic Home Price Index reported home prices were up 17.7% for the past 12 months ending September, spurring the record gains in home equity wealth.

To find out just how much rising home values have impacted equity, we turn to the latest Homeowner Equity Insights from CoreLogic. According to that report, the average homeowner’s equity has grown by $56,700 over the last 12 months.  Here in the Gallatin Valley,  homeowners' equity gains were higher than the national average.  If you'd like to know your equity position, give me a call and I'll get an analysis into your hands right away.  406.570.1653

Curious how your state stacks up? Check out the map below to find out the average equity gain for your area.The Average Homeowner Gained over $56,700 in Equity over the Past Year |<img width='700' height='auto'  src=

How Rising Equity Impacts You

If you’re already a homeowner, equity not only builds your wealth, it also opens doors for you to achieve your goals. It works like this: when you sell your house, the equity you built up comes back to you in the sale. You

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Two Reasons Why Waiting to Buy Could Cost You.

Two Reasons Why Waiting a Year To Buy Could Cost You | MyKCM

If you’re a renter with a desire to become a homeowner, or a homeowner who’s decided your current house no longer fits your needs, you may be hoping that waiting a year might mean better market conditions to purchase a home.

To determine if you should buy now or wait, you need to ask yourself two simple questions:

  1. What will home prices be like in 2022?
  2. Where will mortgage rates be by the end of 2022?

Let’s shed some light on the answers to both of these questions.

What will home prices be like in 2022?

Three major housing industry entities project continued home price appreciation for 2022. Here are their forecasts:

  • Freddie Mac: 5.3%
  • Fannie Mae: 5.1%
  • Mortgage Bankers Association: 8.4%

Using the average of the three projections (6.27%), a home that sells for $350,000 today would be valued at $371,945 by the end of next year. That means, if you delay, it could cost you more. As a prospective buyer, you could pay an additional $21,945 if you wait.

Where will mortgage rates be by the end of 2022?

Today, the 30-year fixed mortgage rate is hovering near historic lows. However, most experts believe rates will rise as the economy continues to recover. Here are the forecasts for the fourth quarter of 2022 by the three major entities mentioned above:

  • Freddie Mac: 3.8%
  • Fannie Mae:  3.2%
  • Mortgage Bankers Association: 4.2%

That averages out to 3.7% if you include all three forecasts, and it’s nearly a full percentage point higher than today’s rates. Any increase in mortgage rates will increase your cost.

What does it mean for you if both home values and mortgage rates rise?

You’ll pay more in mortgage payments each month if both variables increase. Let’s assume you purchase a $350,000 home this year with a 30-year fixed-rate loan at 2.86% after making a 10% down payment. According to the mortgage calculator from SmartAsset, your monthly mortgage payment (including principal and interest payments, and estimated home insurance, taxes in your area, and other fees) would be approximately $1,899.

That same home could cost $371,945 by the

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Advantages of Living in a Small House

While the jury is still out on whether or not Tiny Houses -- micro-houses of 500 sq feet or less --  are here to stay or just a passing fad, Smaller Homes may be just the thing for those looking to live in high-demand areas.  Bigger than a Tiny House,  small homes range from 1000 - 2000 square feet.  Cottages, bungalows, and shotgun houses are all typical of the smaller homes that have been prevalent through generations of homeownership in the US.  In many areas including Bozeman and the Gallatin Valley, there is a wealth of them.  To get into 'hot' neighborhoods without getting into the really high prices, small homes represent a real option for some to live in a central location. What a small home lacks in space, it makes up for in easy access to amenities and walkable neighborhoods.  And with ready access to VRBOs and other short-term vacation rentals, a homeowner can get away without having that spare bedroom.  (You can always put up visiting friends and family at a nearby Airbnb.  And why not share meals at nearby restaurants? You know you hate cooking for a crowd!)

     According to a recent post in the finance section of Business Insider, it's not unusual for the value of small homes to rise faster than that of larger homes. In one region of Florida, small homes showed a dramatic growth rate of 19.5% each year (2013-2016), while the area's largest homes appreciated by only 5.1% during the same time period.  http://www.businessinsider.com/are-smaller-homes-valuable-2017-2 . The greater price appreciation of smaller homes is the result of people choosing a cheaper entry point into areas of higher demand, higher prices, and higher taxation.

     In addition to the greater rate of appreciation, the costs for maintaining a smaller house are significantly lower.  According to a recent article on Trulia.com,  the electric bill for a 1000-square-foot home is approximately $200 less per month than the electric bill for a 3000-sq-ft home on average.  Even routine repairs and maintenance are less expensive for a smaller house:  replacing a (smaller)

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